Who needs a WWC Check?

A WWC Check is required by a person if they engage in certain paid or unpaid work with children, described as ‘child-related work’ under the WWC Act.

‘Child-related work’ has a specific definition which is found in section 6 of the WWC Act: Work is child-related work if the usual duties of the work involve, or are likely to involve, contact with a child in connection with one of the categories below and no exemptions apply.

Answering the questions below will assist you to determine if a person is in child-related work and requires a WWC Check:

  1. Is the person doing paid, unpaid or volunteer work or carrying out a business in connection with any of the categories of child-related work? To see all the categories read Factsheet 1: What is 'Child-Related Work'?

    If you answered YES to the above question then please consider Question 2, below. If you answered NO to the above question a WWC Check is not required.

  2. Do the usual duties of the work involve, or are they likely to involve, contact with a child (where that child is not a fellow employee or employed by you)?

    Special provisions apply to Managerial Officers only in connection with Category 1 – a child care service, who are deemed to be in child-related work whether or not they have contact with a child.

    If you answered YES to the above question then please consider Question 3, below. If you answered NO to the above question a WWC Check is not required.

  3. Does an exemption apply? If a person is exempt they are ineligible to apply for a WWC Check. Click here for more information about exemptions.

If you answered YES to Question 3, a WWC Check is not required. If you answered NO, then the person is in child-related work and must apply for a WWC Check.

Below is the list of categories identified in the WWC Act with the relevant exemptions, some examples and considerations when considering if a person is in child-related work. Please note this table is a guide only and does not include all circumstances or variations; the examples provided are also not an exhaustive list. For more information please see Factsheet 2: Child-Related Work and Exemptions.

If more than one category describes the work a person does or they have more than one child-related job then consider the following:

  • if a person has a paid and a volunteer/unpaid job in child-related work they must select the category of child-related work that applies to their paid employment and apply as a paid employee (or self-employed person);
  • if a person has more than one paid, or more than one volunteer or unpaid job in child-related work then the category for which an exemption does not apply is the category they should apply under.
  1. A child care service (means a child care service as defined in the Child Care Services Act 2007 s4 or an education and care service as defined in the Education and Care Services National Law (Western Australia) s5(1)

  2. A community kindergarten registered under Part 5 of the School Education Act. 1999

  3. An educational institution for children

  4. A coaching or private tuition service of any kind, but not including an informal arrangement entered into for private or domestic purposes

  5. An arrangement for the accommodation/care of children, whether in a residential facility or private residence, but not including an informal arrangement made by a parent of the child concerned or accommodation/care provided by a relative of the child

  6. A placement arrangement or secure care arrangement under the Children and Community Services Act 2004

  7. The performance by an officer, as defined in the Children and Community Services Act 2004, of a function given to the officer under that Act

  8. A detention centre, as defined in the Young Offenders Act 1994 section 3.

  9. A community child health service

  10. A counselling or other support service

  11. A religious organisation

  12. A club/association/movement (including of a cultural/recreational/sporting nature and whether incorporated or not) with a significant membership/involvement of children, but not including an informal arrangement entered into for private/domestic purposes

  13. A ward of a public or private hospital in which children are ordinarily patients

  14. A baby sitting or child minding service, but not including an informal arrangement entered into for private or domestic purposes

  15. An overnight camp, regardless of the type of accommodation or how many children are involved

  16. A transport service specifically for children

  17. A school crossing service, being a service provided to assist children to cross roads on their way to and from school

  18. A children’s entertainment or party service

  19. Any other work of a kind prescribed by the regulations

  20. Work that is the exercise or performance by a person of a power or duty delegated to the person by the CEO under section 45 of the Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act 2004.

Page last updated25 November 2016