Who needs a WWC Check?

Only people who are engaged in or propose to be in ‘child-related work’ can apply for a WWC Check. ‘Child-related work’ has a specific definition which is found in section 6 of the WWC Act.

Answering the questions below will assist you to determine if you, your employees, volunteers or students are in child-related work and require a WWC Check:

  1. Are you or any of your employees, volunteers or students doing paid, unpaid or volunteer work in connection with any of the categories of child-related work? Click here to see all the categories of child-related work on Factsheet 1: What is 'Child-Related' Work?

    If you answered YES to the above question then please consider Question 2, below. If you answered NO to the above question a WWC Check is not required.

  2. Do the usual duties of the work involve, or are they likely to involve, contact with a child (where that child is not a fellow employee or employed by you)?
    Special provisions apply to Managerial Officers in connection with Category 1 – a child care service, who are deemed to be in child-related work whether or not they have contact with a child.

    If you answered YES to the above question then please consider Question 3, below. If you answered NO to the above question a WWC Check is not required.

  3. Does an exemption apply? If an employee, volunteer or student is exempt they are ineligible to apply for a WWC Check please see Factsheet 2: Child-Related Work and Exemptions for a full list of exemptions.

    If you answered YES to Question 3, a WWC Check is not required. If you answered NO, then you, your employee, volunteer or student is in child-related work and must apply for a WWC Check.

For more information about the categories of child-related work, including some examples please see our ‘Who Needs a WWC Check?’ page.

Do you have volunteers who receive a small payment or remuneration?

If you have volunteers who engage in child-related work and you give them some financial reward or remuneration then you must determine if they are considered to be a volunteer or paid person. This could influence whether they need a WWC Check.

If a volunteer receives payments that only cover the costs of carrying out their child-related work then they are considered to be a volunteer by the WWC Screening Unit. For example a volunteer secretary of a sporting club may receive an honorarium to cover the costs of postage, stationery and travel expenses. If however, the remuneration covers more than their expenses for their child-related work, then they are likely to be considered a ‘paid employee’ for the purposes of their WWC Check. For example if an umpire for a sporting club receives $100 per game, then they are likely to be considered a paid employee as their remuneration exceeds their expenses. For more information to help you to determine if the work is considered voluntary or paid please click here.

What other screening is available if a person is ineligible to obtain a WWC Check

If you have an employee, volunteer or student working in your organisation who is not eligible for a WWC Check e.g. because an exemption may apply, but you still want them to undergo a criminal record check you can:

Page last updated13 September 2018